Posts Tagged ‘iowa’

Jay Cost, Weekly Standard – What Iowa Tells Us About the State of the Race

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

Jay Cost.

Sasha Issenberg, Slate – How Romney’s five years of hard work in Iowa paid off this week

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

Slate.

Karl Rove – After winning Iowa, Mitt Romney is now the heavy favorite

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

Wall Street Journal op-ed.

Iowa Republican caucus – 41% could change mind. Romney at 24%, Ron Paul at 22%, Rick Santorum at 15%

Saturday, December 31st, 2011

Des Moines Register:

The poll, conducted Tuesday through Friday, shows support at 24 percent for Romney, the former governor of Massachusetts; 22 percent for Paul, a Texas congressman; and 15 percent for the surging Rick Santorum, a former U.S. senator from Pennsylvania.

But the four-day results don’t reflect just how quickly momentum is shifting in a race that has remained highly fluid for months. If the final two days of polling are considered separately, Santorum rises to second place, with 21 percent, pushing Paul to third, at 18 percent. Romney remains the same, at 24 percent.

“Momentum’s name is Rick Santorum,” said the Register’s pollster, J. Ann Selzer.

Another sign of the race’s volatility: 41 percent of likely caucusgoers say they could still be persuaded to change their minds.

 

Matthew Franck on Iowa decision

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

“Law, Feelings, and Religion at the Bar in Iowa”The Supreme Court of Iowa’s decision to redefine marriage abandons reason and replaces it with feelings as the standard of public consensus.

What happens when judicial arrogance becomes so habitual as to become second nature? This past Friday, April 3, the Supreme Court of Iowa provided an answer: judicial arrogance transforms into smug self-deception. This is not the question the court thought it was answering. It claimed to be addressing the question of whether “exclusion of a class of Iowans from civil marriage”-namely the “class” of “gay and lesbian people” who wish to marry others of the same sex-can be justified by the state. But the opinion for a unanimous court in Varnum v. Brien, written by Justice Mark Cady, actually says very little about matters of such justification. By contrast, it speaks volumes about the extent to which American judicial power, having burst free of all constraints, is now in the grip of a banal routinization of tyranny so complete that the tyrants do not recognize their own character as they blandly overturn many centuries of civilization in a day’s work.