Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

So-called “Chronicle of Higher Education” silences Naomi Riley for criticizing higher education – John Fund, National Review

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

John Fund:

Many academics I know agree that black-studies programs are often slipshod, academically non-rigorous, and repositories for “grievance” politics. But they won’t say so publicly, for fear of being branded as “racists.” Naomi Riley had the courage to state the obvious. The author of two substantive books on higher education, she has worked with me as an editor on such topics at the Wall Street Journal. She knows her stuff. Certainly in a 500-word blog post she oversimplified, but that’s the nature of the blog that the Chronicle hired her to write for — it consists of quick opinion takes on issues of the day. It is even called “Brainstorm” to make clear it doesn’t publish the definitive word on any issue.

Her lone blog post brought a torrent of criticism, attacks by MSNBC, and finally a petition demanding that the Chronicle “dismiss” her. It was signed by 6,500 professors and graduate students.

California Teachers Association the “worst union in America” — City Journal’s Troy Senik

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

Brian Calle, Orange County Register:

The 340,000-member CTA – the state’s largest labor union and an affiliate of the nation’s largest union (the 3.2 million-member National Education Association) – is far more than an advocate for teachers; it is an instrument for political dominance across a spectrum of issues in California and elsewhere. Senik’s characterizes the CTA as “a political behemoth that blocks meaningful education reform, protects failing and even criminal educators and inflates teacher pay and benefits to unsustainable levels.”

[...]

They are “the highest-paid teachers in the nation,” at an average of $68,000 annually, according to Senik. And that doesn’t take into account pension benefits, which typically allow teachers to retire after 30 years with 75 percent of their salary.

Liberals in Kansas Senate continue to obstruct reform agenda of House, Gov. Brownback

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

Kansas City Star.

Kansas budget debate continues between House and Senate

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

Lawrence Journal World.

Shikha Dalmia on “misguided” progressives – Scott Walker Is No More Anti-Union than FDR

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

Dalmia:

He’s no more anti-union and right-wing than the libs’ beloved FDR—and that’s his real problem.

Numerous websites have sprouted up dedicated to “keeping an eye on this radical extremist.” Wisconsin Democratic Party chairman Mike Tate has condemned Walker’s alleged “unprecedented assault on not just the rights of Wisconsin workers, but also our shared values and proud Wisconsin institutions.”

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker produces budget surplus for second year in a row

Saturday, May 12th, 2012

RedState.

Kansas Legislature runs out of time, will continue past 90-day session

Saturday, May 12th, 2012

Topeka Capital Journal.  Wichita Eagle.

 

Jay Cost: Obama’s Nosebleed Seats Problem

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

Cost:

If these numbers are borne out on Election Day, then Obama will do about as well with the youth vote and African American vote as Bill Clinton did in 1996 or John Kerry did in 2004. Obviously the election is a long way off, the point is merely that the president is having trouble retaining the support of the subsets of these groups whose support is actually up for grabs.

 

Kansas House conservatives approve tax increases for extracurricular activities at government K-12 schools, already funded at close to $13,000 per student

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

Kansas City Star:

The plan to increase funding for extracurricular activities applies only to 66 school districts where local option funding equals at least 30 percent of state aid.

It would apply to five school districts in Johnson County and to the Bonner Springs and Piper districts in Wyandotte County.

It also would cover eight districts in Sedgwick County, including Goddard, Maize, Derby, Haysville and Mulvane.

The proposal had been tried in the House before and was defeated partly because of a bias against Johnson County.

 

Legislative update from Olathe Republican Rep. Mike Kiegerl

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

From Mike Kiegerl:

ALL ALONE AND NO PLACE TO GO

As of Friday May 4, all administrative staff of the House was discharged, which means I will have no secretary during the (hopefully) last week of the session and will be harder to reach. Please use my personal email address for routine messages and requests. Do not expect the usual 24 hr response as I have to answer without help after a long day in session. For urgent, time sensitive discussions, call me while I’m on the floor at 1-785-296-7615. Please use discretion and understand that I will not be able to engage in long conversations and cannot take calls during final action voting.

 

HELL WEEK COMING UP

Inasmuch as we still have three major issues to resolve and bills to pass, leadership advised all legislators to rest up this weekend as we will be having long sessions. All nighters are not unusual and we have one or two every year debating and voting the omnibus appropriations (budget) bill which must pass to keep the government liquid, but this year in addition we still need to agree on a controversial tax reform bill, and wrestle with the 800 pound gorilla in the room: redistricting. We also have numerous routine bills passed by both chambers in committee to iron out differences. Once compromise is reached, both House and Senate must vote on them again before they can go to the governor for signature. (more…)

Are Democrats in trouble in Wisconsin? Just as many Republicans vote in non-competitive Scott Walker primary as union-heavy, five-way Democratic primary for governor

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

Moe Lane at RedState.

Wisconsin Journal Sentinel:

The Democrats barely drew more votes Tuesday than Walker, in spite of the fact that their party had a competitive primary and Walker did not.

With 95% of the vote counted, Walker had nearly as many votes as all the Democrats combined in their primary.

Unions losing election in Wisconsin Democratic primary for governor

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

Daily Beast:

Wisconsin and national unions have donated almost $4.5 million to a super PAC backing Kathleen Falk, the former Dane County executive who has pledged to veto any budget that doesn’t restore collective bargaining.

But with just a few days left before the primary, Falk trails 2010 Democratic nominee Tom Barrett, the mayor of Milwaukee, 38 to 21 percent among primary voters, according to a Marquette University Law School poll (considered the most reliable in the Badger State) released last week. Barrett also supports restoring the collective-bargaining rights unions have lost, but has said he’d do so through a standalone bill, an approach that would provide significantly less leverage with legislators.

Heavily engaged voters in Wisconsin – 1 in 5 has donated to candidates, 1 in 6 goes to a rally

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

Wisconsin Journal Sentinel:

Those are far bigger numbers than Americans on the whole have reported in recent election surveys. In 2000, only one in 20 Americans said they attended a political rally. In the historic, high-turnout 2008 election, about one in 11 did.

The Marquette poll also illustrates how political participation in Wisconsin has varied across party, age, gender and other lines.

The most moderate voters have been the least engaged – less likely than liberals or conservatives to make political donations, post political signs, try to influence the way other people vote or discuss politics with their friends and family, according to the survey, taken April 26-29.

Older voters have been much more likely than younger voters to donate to campaigns. Younger voters have been more likely than older voters to attend rallies.

Club for Growth “Key Vote Alert” – “NO” on Student Loan Subsidies – Supported by Kevin Yoder, Mike Pompeo

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

Club for Growth:

KEY VOTE ALERT
“NO” on Student Loan Subsidies (HR 4628)

The Club for Growth urges all House members to vote “NO” on the Interest Rate Reduction Act (HR 4628). The House may consider it on the floor as early as today. A vote on this plan, and perhaps procedural votes, will be included in the Club’s 2012 Congressional Scorecard.

Regardless of the merits, the government should not be in the business of subsidizing student loans.

Before 2007, the interest rate for subsidized Stafford student loans was 6.8%, but House Democrats voted that year to lower the rate to 3.4% for the next four years. This bill would extend that rate for new loans for another year, costing taxpayers $6 billion. It’s bad policy to subsidize student loans in the first place, but the net result will likely drive up tuition costs for all students, making the overall cost of the bill much higher than its current price tag. House Republicans want to offset this subsidy by repealing the Prevention and Public Health Fund that was created with the passage of ObamaCare. That fund should indeed be repealed, but fiscal conservatives should only try to repeal the entire law, not just parts of it. And for the most part, the offset is irrelevant. Fiscal conservatives should not be promoting bad policy, which this bill contains.

Our Congressional Scorecard for the 112th Congress provides a comprehensive rating of how well or how poorly each member of Congress supports pro-growth, free-market policies and will be distributed to our members and to the public.

UPDATE: The bill passed 215-195.

3rd District Congressman Kevin Yoder raises tuition rates for college students by voting for loan subsidies, opposed by Club for Growth

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

Club for Growth:

KEY VOTE ALERT
“NO” on Student Loan Subsidies (HR 4628)

The Club for Growth urges all House members to vote “NO” on the Interest Rate Reduction Act (HR 4628). The House may consider it on the floor as early as today. A vote on this plan, and perhaps procedural votes, will be included in the Club’s 2012 Congressional Scorecard.

Regardless of the merits, the government should not be in the business of subsidizing student loans.

Before 2007, the interest rate for subsidized Stafford student loans was 6.8%, but House Democrats voted that year to lower the rate to 3.4% for the next four years. This bill would extend that rate for new loans for another year, costing taxpayers $6 billion. It’s bad policy to subsidize student loans in the first place, but the net result will likely drive up tuition costs for all students, making the overall cost of the bill much higher than its current price tag. House Republicans want to offset this subsidy by repealing the Prevention and Public Health Fund that was created with the passage of ObamaCare. That fund should indeed be repealed, but fiscal conservatives should only try to repeal the entire law, not just parts of it. And for the most part, the offset is irrelevant. Fiscal conservatives should not be promoting bad policy, which this bill contains.

Our Congressional Scorecard for the 112th Congress provides a comprehensive rating of how well or how poorly each member of Congress supports pro-growth, free-market policies and will be distributed to our members and to the public.

UPDATE: The bill passed 215-195.

Mike Pompeo again votes against Club for Growth, this time on student loan subsidies

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

Club for Growth statement.  Link to final vote, passed 215-195.

Mark Steyn on Obama’s girlfriend; Harvard professor Elizabeth Warren being 1/32nd Cherokee – “Have you dated a composite woman? They’re America’s hottest new demographic”

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

National Review.

53% Think Recent Graduates Will Have ‘Very Difficult’ Time Finding A Job – Rasmussen

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

Rasmussen: “A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey shows that 89% of American Adults believe it will be at least somewhat difficult for recent graduates to find a job in today’s economy.”

Colorado school charges 6 year old with “sexual harassment,” suspends student for singing ‘I’m Sexy And I Know It’

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

CBS Denver:

A 6-year-old boy was suspended from his suburban Denver school for three days after school officials said he told a girl “I’m sexy and I know it,” a line from a popular song.

D’Avonte Meadows, a first-grader at Sable Elementary School in Aurora, is accused of sexual harassment and disrupting other students, according to a letter the school district sent to his mother after he was sent home Wednesday.

Liberal-run Kansas Senate rejects 401(k) reform for $8 billion under-funded pension system

Friday, May 4th, 2012

Kansas City Star.