Analysis — Todd Tiahrt endorses in Nov. 3 New York race. Jim DeMint agrees with Tiahrt, again.

RedState.com’s Erick Erickson announced that by noon today (Wednesday, Oct. 28), conservatives will know the “leaders who will stand with us, not suck up to us” by their clear support of Conservative Party nominee Doug Hoffman in New York’s congressional election on Tuesday, Nov. 3.

In Kansas, 4th District Congressman Todd Tiahrt has alone met the standard set by Erick Erickson.

US Senator Jim DeMint (R-South Carolina) endorsed Jerry Moran over Todd Tiahrt.  But since the endorsement, the New York race is one of two major events which have aligned DeMint closely with Tiahrt.

Earlier this month, there was the US House vote on the “Travel Promotion Act of 2009.”

This vote was a big deal for Senator DeMint, who wrote a Washington Post op-ed where he called the legislation “a $400 million corporate welfare boondoggle.”  The Club for Growth issued a “Key Vote Alert,” asking conservatives to vote against the legislation.  And that’s what Tiahrt did.  In the House, Tiahrt opposed the nearly-half-billion-dollar travel industry bailout; Moran supported it alongside Republican Lynn Jenkins and Democrat Dennis Moore.

On perhaps an even bigger issue in New York — one that some are calling an event that will play a major role in the direction of the entire Republican party — Tiahrt even beat DeMint to the punch.

On October 23, Tiahrt endorsed Doug Hoffman in the November 3 special election for New York’s 23rd Congressional District, where former Republican Congressman John McHugh served before becoming Army Secretary under President Obama.  Doug Hoffman is not the actual Republican choice, but rather the Conservative Party’s nominee.

On October 27, Jim DeMint followed Tiahrt’s lead and endorsed Doug Hoffman.

Republican nominee Dede Scozzafava, a Republican state legislator, is considered by the liberal blog The Daily Kos to be to the left of Democratic nominee Bill Owens:  Scozzafava won a “Maggie Award” from Planned Parenthood, voted for New York state bailout-type legislation, and is or has past been supported by ACORN, the AFL-CIO, the SEIO, and NARAL.  Scozzafava’s husband is a local union leader, and Scozzafava supports the anti-worker, anti-business “card-check” legislation.  Recently, by all indications, Mr. Scozzafava violated state law — and the campaign team backed him up — when he filed a false police report and lied about Weekly Standard reporter John McCormack, who was asking questions that the Scozzafavas didn’t want to answer.  The campaign was caught in a lie when it later justified the police report by stating the reporter yelled at the Scozzafavas — but the Associated Press listened to McCormack’s audio recording and defended McCormack.

About the false police report, National Review’s Jim Geraghty wrote, “When a candidate commits a crime, the usual bonds of loyalty that a party requires are severed… In New York, Dede Scozzafava – or, more specifically, her husband – has, at least on the face of events, filed a false police report when he called the cops on Weekly Standard reporter John McCormack.”  Read McCormack’s review of the events in his article, “Dede’s Losing, Call the Cops.”

Support of Dede Scozzafava from the RNC, the NRCC, House Republican leader John Boehner, and Newt Gingrich support has continued.

But major endorsements have poured in for Conservative Party nominee Doug Hoffman:  Fred Thompson endorsed “pre-McCormack-gate,” and endorsements since the police incident include Steve Forbes, Sarah Palin, Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty, and even former Oklahoma Congressman Tom Cole, who ran the NRCC from 2006-2008.

Polling shows that Doug Hoffman can win this race.  Former NRCC leader Tom Cole even said that Hoffman is “the only Republican who can win this special election.”

If Doug Hoffman wins Tuesday’s election in New York, it won’t be because of Republican leadership but because of conservative leadership, and Todd Tiahrt will be able claim a role in the victory.

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