Hodge on next KU chancellor, Dr. Bernadette Gray-Little: “Equal opportunity for over-paid school administrators in Kansas”

Benjamin Hodge, at Race42012:

As reported by the University of Kansas:

Dr. Bernadette Gray-Little will be the 17th chancellor at The University of Kansas. Gray-Little, who will be the first woman and first African American to lead KU, will begin her chancellorship on August 15.

Reported Monday was that Gray-Little will be given a 25% increase in salary, compared to the former college leader.

Bernadette Gray-Little will receive a maximum of $425,000 per year, compared with Hemenway’s state-approved maximum of $340,352. The state contribution to the salary, however, remains the same: $267,177.

The difference, then, must be made up by private funds from the Kansas University Endowment Association. For Hemenway, private donors chipped in $73,175 per year. For Gray-Little, private sources will provide $157,823.

I wonder how many donors to the KU Endowment know that their money is going to increase a PhDs salary by $80,000 a year?

The University of Kansas, it must be said, is one of the colleges today in Kansas breaking the law, almost proudly so.  A few years ago, Kansas passed a concealed carry law that explicitly prohibits local governments from banning the carrying of weapons in vehicles.  It leaves it up to local governments to decide whether to ban the on-person carrying of weapons within facilities (of course, nearly all, therefore, opt to take away the right).

KU and K-State immediately then decided to call all parking lots – all of them – “facilities.”  To this day, both KU and K-State prohibit the carrying of weapons within vehicles on campus, though they don’t even attempt to enforce it.

I must ask: other than government (especially government education), in what other industries do leaders repeatedly get pay raises and awards for knowingly violating the law?

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