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Today’s News from the University of Kansas
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FROM THE OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS  |  http://www.ur.ku.edu

Headlines:

* KU research finds human emotions hold sway over physical health around the world

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/4/emotion.shtml

Most strikingly, the link between emotion and physical health was strongest in the poorest countries surveyed.

* ‘Jana Mackey Day’ set to honor legacy of slain KU law student

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/4/mackey.shtml

Mackey, who grew up in Hays, spent countless hours volunteering to aid victims of sexual assault and domestic violence.

* Kansas Geological Survey wins contract to test new oil production methods

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/4/kgsoil.shtml

If successful, the new techniques would not only produce more oil but would be more cost effective, energy efficient and environmentally friendly than current production methods. HOMETOWN INTEREST: Marion and Sedgwick counties

* KU names 15 Kansas Asia Scholars for 2009

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/4/ksasiascholars.shtml

Students preparing to teach at the elementary or secondary level will spend three weeks in China studying Chinese language, culture and history. HOMETOWNS: Basehor, Clyde, Derby, Dodge City, Garden City, Lawrence, Lenexa, Mission, Olathe, Overland Park and Stilwell, Kan.; Burr Ridge, Ill.; and  Sumner, Wash.

FULL TEXT OF STORIES BELOW

More KU news at http://www.news.ku.edu
NEW: Multimedia features at http://www.features.ku.edu/

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
• RESEARCH MATTERS: This weekly broadcast on Kansas Public Radio will explore
research under way at KU. It airs at 2:58 p.m. Mondays; 9:04 a.m. Fridays; and
1:04 p.m. Sundays. Hear it now at http://www.researchmatters.ku.edu
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Contact: Brendan M. Lynch, University Relations, (785) 864-8855, blynch@ku.edu

KU research finds human emotions hold sway over physical health around the world

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/4/emotion.shtml

LAWRENCE — A researcher from the University of Kansas has spearheaded a new investigation into the link between emotions and health. The research proves that positive emotions are critical for upkeep of physical health for people worldwide, above all for those who are deeply impoverished.

The study, a joint undertaking between KU and Gallup, will be presented today at the annual meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society in Chicago.

“We’ve known for a while now that emotions play a critical role in physical health,” said Sarah Pressman, assistant professor of psychology at KU and a Gallup senior research associate. “But until recently, most of this research was conducted only in industrialized countries. So we couldn’t know whether feelings like happiness or sadness matter to the health of people who have more pressing concerns — like getting enough to eat or finding shelter. But now we do.”

Data from the Gallup World Poll drove the findings, with adults in more than 140 countries providing a representative sample of 95 percent of the world’s population. The sample included more than 150,000 adults.

Participants reported emotions such as happiness, enjoyment, worry and sadness. They described their physical health problems — such as pain and fatigue — and answered questions about whether their most basic needs like food, shelter and personal safety were adequately met.

According to Pressman, positive emotions unmistakably are linked to better health, even when taking into account a lack of basic needs. The inverse holds true as well: Negative emotions were a reliable predator of worse health.

Most strikingly, the association between emotion and physical health was more powerful than the connection between health and basic human physical requirements, like adequate nourishment. Even without shelter or food, positive emotions were shown to boost health. Indeed, this association was strongest in the poorest countries surveyed.

Thus, the link between emotional health and physical health looks to be a worldwide fact, and especially so for people living with the fewest creature comforts.

More on the Gallup World Poll is available online at www.gallup.com/video/106357/Introducing-Gallup-World-Poll.aspx.

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Contact: Mindie Paget, School of Law, (785) 864-9205, mpaget@ku.edu

‘Jana Mackey Day’ set to honor legacy of slain KU law student

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/4/mackey.shtml

LAWRENCE — A University of Kansas law student known throughout the state for her work on women’s issues will be honored posthumously this month.

Kansas lawmakers will join Gov. Kathleen Sebelius in marking International Women’s Day by recognizing Jana Mackey, a 25-year-old KU law student who was murdered by her ex-boyfriend last July in Lawrence. Sebelius has signed a proclamation recognizing Sunday, March 8, as “Jana Mackey Day in Kansas.”

On March 5, Sens. Marci Francisco, D-Lawrence, and Janis Lee, D-Kensington, will sponsor a resolution honoring Mackey. On the House side, Reps. Barbara Ballard, D-Lawrence; Paul Davis, D-Lawrence; and Eber Phelps, D-Hays, will present Mackey’s family with a formal certificate on March 9.

Mackey, who grew up in Hays, spent countless hours volunteering to aid victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. She also served three years as one of the youngest lobbyists at the Kansas Statehouse with the National Organization for Women.

After her death, Mackey’s family and friends established a national campaign to help her service live on through others. Symbolic of the number of people who attended her funeral, the Eleven Hundred Torches campaign urges hundreds of ordinary citizens to serve others.

Sebelius has joined the campaign and is calling on all Kansans to set aside time March 8 to volunteer in their communities.

Special volunteer events are being planned in Lawrence and Hays on that day. Women’s Transitional Care Services in Lawrence has organized service projects from 1 to 4 p.m. March 8 behind the Douglas County United Way building, 2518 Ridge Court. Volunteers will be able to choose from several projects, including making parting baskets for women who are leaving the shelter, cleaning a storage shed and taking inventory and signing letters to legislators in support of continued funding for domestic violence shelters and programs. For more information, contact Eva Vlach at (785) 865-3956 or evlach@wtcskansas.org.

International Women’s Day began in 1908 with a 15,000-woman march through New York City calling for equal voting and work rights for women. In 1913, the event was officially scheduled on March 8. Today International Women’s Day is celebrated worldwide and is an official holiday in 15 nations.

For more information about Eleven Hundred Torches, visit www.1100torches.org.

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• NO TUITION INCREASE FOR FOUR YEARS: Students can now determine the tuition
and fee costs of an entire bachelor’s degree. Learn more at http://www.tuition.ku.edu
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Contact: Rex Buchanan, Kansas Geological Survey, (785) 864-2106
Hometown interest: Marion and Sedgwick counties

Kansas Geological Survey wins contract to test new oil production methods

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/4/kgsoil.shtml

LAWRENCE — Researchers at the Kansas Geological Survey, based at the University of Kansas, have been awarded a contract to test a new approach to oil production that could increase U.S. production and reduce drilling costs while minimizing environmental impact.

The $248,000 contract from the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America will be used to assess recently developed techniques that may make it more economical for small producers to squeeze additional oil out of existing wells.

“We’ve seen indications that considerable oil reserves remain that can be tapped by improved oil recovery techniques,” Kansas Geological Survey geologist Lynn Watney said. “But testing is needed to evaluate the new methods and optimally tailor them to specific reservoirs.”

If successful, these techniques would not only produce more oil but would be more cost effective, energy efficient and environmentally friendly than current production methods. Innovations include replacing traditional pump jacks with low-profile, high-volume pumps; drilling lateral drainholes in producing wells; and using low-pressure water pipes to minimize water leakage on the surface.

Kansas Geological Survey scientists are working with an industry partner, Wichita oil producer American Energies Corporation, to test the innovative methods in Marion County’s Hillsboro Field in central Kansas. Production in the Hillsboro Field has dropped significantly since its heyday, and only two wells are currently producing oil — each approximately eight barrels a day.

“About 18 percent of U.S. production comes from wells that produce less than 10 barrels of oil per day,” Watney said. “Among the 42,000 wells in Kansas, the average daily production is slightly over two barrels per day.”

Watney and Kansas Geological Survey co-investigators Saibal Bhattarcharya, John Doveton and David Newell will analyze results as the new techniques are applied to one of the Hillsboro wells, watching to see if production in the well can be pushed upward — possibly to as high as 40 barrels per day.

Like many low-producing wells, the Hillsboro wells contain large quantities of brine, or salt water, that impede oil production. Many wells still containing significant quantities of oil have been abandoned throughout the state because of similarly high water content.

Using the new techniques being tested by the Kansas Geological Survey, the producer will remove excess brine to reach and economically recover the remaining oil. Although these methods have been attempted before, the results have not been widely studied nor have their potential impact on production in Kansas been evaluated.

Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America is a nonprofit corporation established to help meet the nation’s need for hydrocarbon resources produced from reservoirs in America. It was formed by a consortium of U.S. energy research universities, industry and independent research organizations. The mission of the organization is to provide a stewardship role in ensuring the focused research, development and deployment of safe, environmentally sensitive technology that effectively can deliver hydrocarbons from domestic resources to the people of the United States.

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• A GREAT PLACE TO WORK: KU is in the top five among large institutions in 12 out
of 27 categories in the Chronicle of Higher Education’s “2008 Great Colleges to Work
For.” Read more: http://www.news.ku.edu/2008/july/16/greatplacetowork.shtml
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Contact: William Tsutsui, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, (785) 864-3551
Hometowns: Basehor, Clyde, Derby, Dodge City, Garden City, Lawrence, Lenexa, Mission, Olathe, Overland Park and Stilwell, Kan.; Burr Ridge, Ill.; and  Sumner, Wash.

KU names 15 Kansas Asia Scholars for 2009

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/4/ksasiascholars.shtml

LAWRENCE — Fifteen students at the University of Kansas who have been selected as 2009 Kansas Asia Scholars are preparing to study abroad May 22-June 13 in China.

The scholars will spend two weeks studying Chinese language, culture and history at Huazhong Normal University in Wuhan, China. A third week will be spent traveling and viewing sites such as the Great Wall of China and the Forbidden City in Beijing. They will be accompanied by Sheree Willis, executive director of KU’s Confucius Institute.

Funded by the Freeman Foundation of New York and Stowe, Vt., the program is designed for students who intend to become elementary or secondary school teachers through the undergraduate teacher education program in KU’s School of Education. To be eligible, students must have a grade-point average of 2.75 and be enrolled in or preparing to enter a teacher education program for subject areas that can include teaching about China.

While they are in China, the scholars will complete two three-credit-hour undergraduate courses in elementary conversational Chinese and East Asian history taught at Huazhong Normal University. After returning to Kansas, the KU students will create service-learning projects to share their experiences in China with students in elementary and secondary schools.

A partner university of the Confucius Institute at KU, Huazhong Normal University is a comprehensive university with about 20,000 students with a teacher preparation program considered among the best in China. It is known for its top academic programs in education, physics and history and its national-level research centers in modern Chinese history and Chinese linguistics and language pedagogy.

Wuhan, with a population of about 9.7 million, is China’s fourth-largest city. Located on the Yangzi River in central China, Wuhan is the capital of Hubei Province. The city includes three districts — Wuchang, Hankou and Hanyang. The Wuchang district has more than 20 colleges and universities including Huazhong Normal University. Hankou, one of China’s oldest commercial centers, has stylish shopping centers and is considered the financial heart of central China. The Hanyang district houses some of China’s most important Buddhist temples as well as an industrial center with major manufacturing facilities for Budweiser, Coca-Cola and Peugeot products.

Bill Tsutsui, associate dean for international studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and professor of history, is the director of the Undergraduate Asia Studies Initiative, which includes the Kansas Asia Scholars program, and interim director of the Center for Global and International Studies. For more information on the Kansas Asia Scholars Program, go to www.kas.ku.edu.

Kansas Asia Scholars are listed below by hometown, major, level in school, parents’ names and high school.

CLOUD COUNTY
From Clyde 66938
Jamie Lynn George, senior in middle-level education, daughter of Michael and Barbara George; Clifton-Clyde High School.

DOUGLAS COUNTY
From Lawrence 66047
Christina Marie Eoannou, junior in elementary education, daughter of George and Deb Eoannou; Lawrence High School.

From Lawrence 66049
Nicholas G. Martinez, senior in elementary education, son of John Martinez; Lawrence Free State High School.

FINNEY COUNTY
From Garden City 67846
Ashlea Ann Orrell, senior in unified early childhood education, daughter of Richard and Janet Orrell; Garden City Senior High School.

FORD COUNTY
From Dodge City 67801
Ashley Kay Million, master’s student in the fifth-year education licensure program, daughter of Mike and Brenda Million; bachelor’s degree in secondary-level education from KU, fall 2008; Dodge City Senior High School.

JOHNSON COUNTY
From Lenexa 66219
Ashley Elizabeth Biondo, senior in unified early childhood education, daughter of John and Deborah Biondo; Shawnee Mission West High School, Overland Park.

From Mission 66202
Thomas M. Myers, senior in foreign language education, son of Paul and Janet Myers; Shawnee Mission North High School, Overland Park.

From Olathe 66062
Amanda Rose Riss, junior preparing to study secondary education, daughter of Michael and Donna Riss; Olathe South High School.

Jenna Elise Sutter, senior in unified early childhood education, daughter of Michael and Mary Sutter; Olathe South High School.

From Overland Park 66213
Jennifer Ann Mayer, senior in foreign language education, daughter of Patrice A. Mayer; Blue Valley Northwest High School.

From Stilwell 66085
Torre Christopher Norton, senior in elementary education, son of Chris and Denise Norton; Blue Valley West High School, Overland Park.

LEAVENWORTH COUNTY
From Basehor 66007
Amy D. Rousselo, master’s student in the fifth-year education licensure program, daughter of Thomas and Tammy Rousselo; bachelor’s degree in secondary-level education from KU, fall 2008; Basehor-Linwood High School.

SEDGWICK COUNTY
From Derby 67037
Megan Nicole Gerwick, senior in English and secondary-level education, daughter of Frank and Deborah Gerwick; Derby High School.

ILLINOIS
From Burr Ridge 60527
Alexandra Ann Chebuhar, senior in unified early childhood education, daughter of Thomas and Nancy Chebuhar; Lyons Township High School North, La Grange, Ill.

WASHINGTON
From Sumner 98390
Hannah Elizabeth McMacken, senior in elementary education, daughter of Eileen Riordan; Auburn Riverside High School, Auburn, Wash.

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Office of University Relations, University of Kansas
1314 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence KS 66045
Phone: (785) 864-3256; Fax: (785) 864-3339
kurelations@ku.edu

http://www.ur.ku.edu

Lynn Bretz, director, university communications | lbretz@ku.edu
Todd Cohen, director, university relations | tcohen@ku.edu
Jill Jess, associate director, news | jilljess@ku.edu

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–30– Today’s News from the University of Kansas
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
FROM THE OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS  |  http://www.ur.ku.edu

Headlines:

* First round of recommendations from transit implementation specialists released

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/3/transit.shtml

Contact: Casey Toomay, Lawrence Transit System, (785) 832-3409; or Derek Meier, KU on Wheels, (785) 864-4644, kuonwheels@ku.edu

LAWRENCE — The first round of recommendations from the team of implementation specialists hired to look at coordinating city and university transit systems has been released.

Work to coordinate route and schedule design for the city of Lawrence and the University of Kansas has been under way since last fall. Conversations with more than 30 community groups were held in February. Field observations have occurred and ridership data from both agencies has been analyzed.

Today, the planning team working on coordination of the systems released the short-term recommendations, to be implemented in August 2009. The most significant impact for riders is the creation of a new route that will serve downtown, campus and 31st and Iowa streets at 30-minute intervals using coordination of both systems. Route 11 will provide more frequency to passengers currently using the city’s route 8 and extend service to evenings, weekends and school breaks for current KU on Wheels riders of routes 24 and 25.

The new route 11 can be described as the spine of a coordinated system moving beyond August 2009. The route will be used as the basis for creating other coordinated routes. The route will also share the KU on Wheels buses with the community at the same time, serving students and the KU community with Lawrence Transit System buses.  The coordination will result in seamless services to riders along a new route 11.

In the coming weeks, the planning team will review the recommendations and assemble an action plan.

The complete list of short-term recommendations, to be implemented in August 2009, follows:

— Produce one joint map and timetable. Work is currently under way to create a single map with plans to release in August.

— Use one information hotline call number. The planning team will be working in the coming weeks to determine the options for using a single contact phone number.

— Create a new route 11, replacing the city’s route 8, 31st Street and Iowa to downtown via KU campus; and the university’s route 24, 31st Street and Iowa to campus; and 25, serving downtown to campus. The KU route hearing on March 11 and the Public Transit Advisory Committee meeting on March 24 will be used to gather input on the recommendation.

— Modify the alignment of the university’s route 26, serving 25th Street and Melrose to campus to respond to the creation of route 11. The KU route hearing on March 11 will be used to gather input on the recommendation.

— Interline city routes 4 and 3, allowing the same bus to travel from a Lakeview Road to the I-70 business center going through downtown. Interlining allows the city the opportunity to use smaller vehicles to serve the same area and capture efficiencies where less riders use the system.  Interlining allows systems to optimize the vehicle size based on rider demand. This is a change from using the same buses for service of routes 3 and 2. The Public Transit Advisory Committee meeting on March 24 will be used to gather input on the recommendation.

— Interline city routes 1 and 2 and explore assigning smaller vehicles. Again, a change from using buses currently on routes 1 and 4. The result would be service to the most southern points of the system, Prairie Park Nature Center and Haskell Indian Nations University by the same buses. The Public Transit Advisory Committee meeting on March 24 will be used to gather input on the recommendation.

A detailed report of these recommendations, including maps of proposed route changes, can be found at getonthebuslawrence.org.

Three public meetings are scheduled to gather feedback on the recommendations:

KU Transit Commission Public Hearing
4-6 p.m. Wednesday, March 11
Relays Room, Burge Union
Served by T Route 8 and all KU on Wheels routes. KU route hearing for feedback on the recommended modifications to the university’s routes.

City of Lawrence Public Transit Advisory Committee
4:10 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 24
Lawrence Public Library Auditorium
Served by T Routes 3, 4, and 6 counterclockwise. This regularly scheduled meeting of the Public Transit Advisory Committee has been moved to the library. It will serve as a public meeting for discussion of the recommendations.

6:35 p.m. Tuesday, March 31
City Commission Room, City Hall, 6 E. 6th St.
Served by T Route 6 Clockwise. City Commission meeting.

The initial recommendations were requested by early March, so that university officials could consider approving changes in time for spring break, when many students are deciding where to live for the next academic year. The implementation specialists will continue working on the next phases of their study through 2009 and will release a second round of more extensive recommendations in January 2010 for August 2010 implementation.

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––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Office of University Relations, University of Kansas
1314 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence KS 66045
Phone: (785) 864-3256; Fax: (785) 864-3339
kurelations@ku.edu

http://www.ur.ku.edu

Lynn Bretz, director, university communications | lbretz@ku.edu
Todd Cohen, director, university relations | tcohen@ku.edu
Jill Jess, associate director, news | jilljess@ku.edu

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Today’s News is a free service of the Office of University Relations.
To subscribe, e-mail listproc@listproc.cc.ku.edu with “subscribe KUNEWS1-L” in the body of the e-mail.
To unsubscribe, e-mail listproc@listproc.cc.ku.edu with “unsubscribe KUNEWS1-L” in the body of the e-mail.

–30– Today’s News from the University of Kansas
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
FROM THE OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS  |  http://www.ur.ku.edu

Headlines:

* KU announces 2009 Kansas IDeA Network  scholarship recipients

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/3/idea.shtml

The undergraduate scholarships are funded with a $25.6 million National Institute of Health grant to the Kansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence. Hometowns: Goddard, Great Bend, Lawrence, Liberal, Lindsborg, Olathe, Overland Park, Ulysses and Wichita

* Actions speak louder than words: Forum examines messages, motivations of terrorists

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/3/clasacts.shtml

The presentation will encourage a dialogue about why terrorists carry out their actions as well as what their actions mean.

* Education Interview Day set for March 10

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/3/edinterview.shtml

Attendance is free; no pre-registration required for attendees.

* Author of ‘Two Billion Cars’ to speak at KU School of Engineering

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/3/cars.shtml

Dan Sperling will discuss his book and the prospect of a world that will explode from its current 1 billion cars to 2 billion cars within the next 20 years.

FULL TEXT OF STORIES BELOW

More KU news at http://www.news.ku.edu
NEW: Multimedia features at http://www.features.ku.edu/

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
• RESEARCH MATTERS: This weekly broadcast on Kansas Public Radio will explore
research under way at KU. It airs at 2:58 p.m. Mondays; 9:04 a.m. Fridays; and
1:04 p.m. Sundays. Hear it now at http://www.researchmatters.ku.edu
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Contact: Emily Huckabay, Office for Diversity in Science Training, (785) 864-7316, emilych@ku.edu
Hometowns: Goddard, Great Bend, Lawrence, Liberal, Lindsborg, Olathe, Overland Park, Ulysses and Wichita

KU announces 2009 Kansas IDeA Network  scholarship recipients

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/3/idea.shtml

LAWRENCE — Eight students at the University of Kansas have received 2009 undergraduate research scholarships through the Kansas IDeA (Institutional Development Awards) Network of Biomedical Research Excellence program.

The undergraduate scholarship program at the Lawrence campus is funded through $25.6 million National Institute of Health grant to the Kansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence. Joan Hunt, vice chancellor for biomedical research infrastructure at the KU Medical Center and University Distinguished Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology, is principal investigator.

The Lawrence campus is one of 10 participating campuses that receive support. James A. Orr, professor of molecular biosciences, serves as the Lawrence campus coordinator for the program.

The scholarships encourage students to pursue careers in science and, ultimately, promote biomedical research in Kansas. The spring 2009 the scholarships provide up to $2,000. Scholarships are awarded based on merit and as well as the quality of an applicant’s research proposal. Scholars are selected by a multidisciplinary committee made up of faculty members from molecular biosciences and chemistry.

Scholars present their research results at the annual Summer Undergraduate Research Symposium on campus and at the K-INBRE statewide symposium in January.

Typically, the Kansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence has provided spring and summer funding for six to 10 undergraduate scholars a year. This year, 22 students applied and eight received the scholarships.

The Kansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence program was funded in 2001. The first scholarships were issued to KU undergraduates in summer 2002. Since then, the program has provided support to 65 KU students.

The participating network partners are Emporia State University, Fort Hays State University, Haskell Indian Nations University, Kansas State University, KU’s Lawrence campus, KU Medical Center, Pittsburg State University, Washburn University, Wichita State University and Langston (Okla.) University. More information about the program is online www.kumc.edu/kinbre/.

The 2009 undergraduate research scholarship recipients are listed below by hometown, level in school, major(s), parents’ names, high school (when available) and faculty mentor.

BARTON COUNTY
From Great Bend 67530
Justin Tyler Moyers, senior in chemistry, son of Randy and Lorrie Moyers; Great Bend High School; Brian Blagg, assistant professor of medicinal chemistry

DOUGLAS COUNTY
From Lawrence 66044
Robert Reifort Wiggin, senior in biochemistry; Shawnee Mission West High School; Audrey Lamb, assistant professor of molecular biosciences

GRANT COUNTY
From Ulysses 67880 and Liberal
Katelyn N. Deckert, senior in biochemistry, daughter of Jerry Deckert of Ulysses and Ronald Deckert of Liberal; Liberal High School; Yoshiaki Azuma, assistant professor molecular biosciences

JOHNSON COUNTY
From Olathe 66061
Benjamin James Kurth, senior in biology, son of Paul and Luanne Kurth; Olathe Northwest High School; Michael A. Johnson, assistant professor of chemistry

From Overland Park 66213
Brandon J. Dekosky, senior in chemical engineering, son of  Deborah Dekosky; Blue Valley Northwest High School; Michael Detamore, assistant professor chemical engineering

McPHERSON COUNTY
From Lindsborg 67456
Chantz Palmer Thomas, junior in history and microbiology, son of Greg and Lorye Thomas; Smoky Valley High School; Stephen Benedict, associate professor of molecular  biosciences

SEDGWICK COUNTY
From Goddard 67052
Emilie Ruthanne Mainz, junior in biochemistry, daughter of  Eric and Barbara Mainz; Andale High School; Susan Lunte, the Ralph N. Adams Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacuetical Chemistry

From Wichita 67230
Jason Thomas Stevens, junior in biology, son of Laurie and James Stevens; Andover Central High School; Lisa Timmons, assistant professor of molecular biosciences

SEWARD COUNTY
From Liberal 67901 and Ulysses
Katelyn N. Deckert. SEE GRANT COUNTY

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Contact: Kristi Henderson, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, (785) 864-3663, khenderson@ku.edu

Actions speak louder than words: Forum examines messages, motivations of terrorists

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/3/clasacts.shtml

LAWRENCE — When terrorists strike, their attacks are more than just acts of violence. They’re also acts of communication. University of Kansas professor Robert Rowland will explain how understanding this idea is essential to defeating terrorism in his CLAS ACTS presentation, “The Symbolic DNA of Terrorism.”

The event will take place from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, March 8, in Spooner Hall on the KU campus in Lawrence. Ages 12 and up are welcome. Admission is free. For more information, contact Jessica Beeson at eliasb@ku.edu or visit www.clas.ku.edu/outreach/clasacts.

“Terrorism is fundamentally rhetorical,” said Rowland, who is chair of the Department of Communication Studies within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. “By that I mean terrorists attack targets as a way of sending a message. On 9/11, al Qaeda went after symbols of American military power, political power, and economic power. In order to defeat terrorism, we need to understand the symbolic dimensions behind it.”

Rowland’s presentation will encourage a dialogue about why terrorists carry out their actions as well as what their actions mean. With a new presidential administration reviewing U.S. policies toward terror, public understanding of this issue is more important than ever.

“Policies of the Bush administration and especially the idea of going on the offense have helped al Qaeda recruit,” Rowland said. “Thus, we need a different approach, an approach that focuses on weakening the terrorist message.  This different approach will make all of us much safer and reduce the need for the use of military force.”

Rowland’s presentation is based on research that terrorist groups are motivated by a similar symbolic pattern, which he calls the “DNA” of terrorism: D stands for “denied identity,” N is the “negation of others,” and A stands for “affirmation.”

“Understanding the symbolic DNA of terrorism is important because understanding holds the keys to undercutting the terrorist narrative,” Rowland says. “If we can undercut their story, they will not be able to recruit and the terrorist threats will be eliminated.”

This event is the sixth of eight CLAS ACTS presentations. The remaining presentations are “The Price is Too High,” April 19, an interactive session on children’s nutrition by Ric Steele, associate professor of applied behavioral science; and “Lineage: A Song Cycle,” May 3, a performance of Margaret Walker’s poetry put to song, organized by Maryemma Graham, professor of English. All presentations are free and open to the public and take place on Sundays from 2 to 4 p.m.

CLAS ACTS is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and co-hosted by the Commons. The goal of this series is to share the diverse wealth of College faculty’s knowledge with the community in a manner that educates, entertains and engages the audience.

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• NO TUITION INCREASE FOR FOUR YEARS: Students can now determine the tuition
and fee costs of an entire bachelor’s degree. Learn more at http://www.tuition.ku.edu
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Contact: Melissa Johnson, University Career Center, (785) 864-7677

Education Interview Day set for March 10

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/3/edinterview.shtml

LAWRENCE — The University Career Center at the University of Kansas will host its 28th annual Education Interview Day from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, March 10, at the Kansas Union ballroom. The event is open to students and qualified education professionals.

Attendance is free; no pre-registration required for attendees.

Candidates in all areas of elementary and secondary education, speech-language pathology, special education, school social work, counseling, administration and school psychology are welcome to attend and interview for job opportunities with more than 80 school districts throughout Kansas and the country. Metropolitan areas that will be represented in addition to those from Kansas and Missouri include Washington, D.C.; Phoenix, Ariz.; Tulsa, Okla.; Lincoln and Omaha, Neb.; Fort Worth, Texas; and Kemmerer, Wyo. Interviews will be conducted at the Kansas Union between 9:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Candidates will have the opportunity to schedule interviews on the day of the event between 8:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.

More information about this event, including a list of attending schools, is available at
www.kucareerhawk.com/edinterview or by calling (785) 864-7677.

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• A GREAT PLACE TO WORK: KU is in the top five among large institutions in 12 out
of 27 categories in the Chronicle of Higher Education’s “2008 Great Colleges to Work
For.” Read more: http://www.news.ku.edu/2008/july/16/greatplacetowork.shtml
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Contact: Ian Cahir, School of Engineering, (785) 864-2936, iancahir@ku.edu

Author of ‘Two Billion Cars’ to speak at KU School of Engineering

http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/3/cars.shtml

LAWRENCE — A presentation on the future of automobiles and transportation will be given by Dan Sperling, author of “Two Billion Cars: Driving Toward Sustainability,” at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 25, at Spahr Engineering Classroom in Eaton Hall at the University of Kansas.

The presentation, which is sponsored by KU’s Transportation Research Institute, is free and open to students, faculty and the public.

Sperling is a professor of engineering and environmental science and policy at the University of California-Davis and director of UC-Davis’ Institute of Transportation Studies. He also is on the California Air Resources Board and chairs the Future of Mobility Council of the Davos World Economic Forum.

Sperling will discuss his book and the prospect of a world that will explode from its current 1 billion cars to 2 billion cars within the next 20 years. He will discuss the risks to the global environment and how some of the worst current offenders — California and China — are taking the lead in developing novel solutions that offer the possibility of a sustainable path forward. With the policies embraced in California and the honest recognition of the problems in China, “Two Billion Cars” contends there really is reason for hope in the drive for sustainability. Sperling, as a renowned expert on transportation issues, recently discussed the book on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.”

Refreshments will be served after the presentation in the Locke Atrium of Eaton Hall.

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Office of University Relations, University of Kansas
1314 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence KS 66045
Phone: (785) 864-3256; Fax: (785) 864-3339
kurelations@ku.edu

http://www.ur.ku.edu

Lynn Bretz, director, university communications | lbretz@ku.edu
Todd Cohen, director, university relations | tcohen@ku.edu
Jill Jess, associate director, news | jilljess@ku.edu

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